Martin Lewis outlines four ways to stay warm without hurting your energy bills - 'Heat the human and not the home'

Martin Lewis has outlined the four ways people can stay warm this winter without breaking the bank urging people to “heat the human and not the home”.
Martin Lewis has outlined the four ways people can stay warm this winter without breaking the bank urging people to “heat the human and not the home”.

The Money Saving Expert issued his advice to help people learn efficient ways to stay warm without having to turn on their boiler

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Martin Lewis has outlined the four ways people can stay warm this winter without breaking the bank, urging people to “heat the human and not the home”.

It comes as the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the rate of Consumer Prices Index (CPI) inflation fell to 10.5 per cent in December from 10.7 per cent, suggesting the cost-of-living crisis may have passed its peak.

The Money Saving Expert shared his tips to keep warm this winter.
The Money Saving Expert shared his tips to keep warm this winter.

Despite this, it could be months before people see their energy bills drop.

The Money Saving Expert revealed research by him and his team on ways to keep warm without wasting money.

He said: “It was really depressing, the fact that we needed to do it because of the way energy prices were going and the way some people wouldn’t be able to turn their central heating on,

“As it turned out the research that we did has been really useful, not just for people who are in desperate states... but for many who just want to reduce their central heating.

“Lots of stuff from how you effectively layer clothes, but the one that really took off was small electrical items for heating the person.”

He suggested buying heated gloves which have an initial cost of £5 to buy and cost as little as 1p an hour to run.

Microwave wheat bags and hot water bottles are also a cost effective way of saving money, costing around £5 and using minimum energy to heat up.

He continued by suggesting the use of a hot water bottle in conjunction with a sleeping bag, explaining it will trap the heat, keeping Brits warmer for longer.

Gilets and heated insoles were also listed as efficient ways to keep warm at a low cost despite their more expensive initial cost.

Last month, Lewis issued a warning to people wanting to put their heating on.

Martin Lewis encouraged people to buy hot water bottles.
Martin Lewis encouraged people to buy hot water bottles.

He said: “The general advice from the energy saving trust is that you have your heating on when you need it, and you turn it off when you don't need it. The myth that it is cheaper to have it on all day is false."

He went on to explain that homes prone to condensation use up more energy if you turn heating on and off when you need it, he continued: “In most cases, you turn the heat on when you need it and turn it off when you don't. It's best to do it on a timer and a thermostat."