It should be UK courts and UK legislation that puts into place Britain's human rights laws, says Darren Grimes

Now, of course, one of the most significant issues that so many of us have with this illegal migration is that we have absolutely no idea who these often undocumented migrants are

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If you've been watching GB News today, you'll know that Nigel Farage has been reporting from the English Channel, predicting that more than a thousand migrants will cross the Channel this week, with at least 300 people coming over today alone.

Now, of course, one of the most significant issues that so many of us have with this illegal migration is that we have absolutely no idea who these often undocumented migrants are. Do they share our values? Do they mean us harm? Will they follow our laws? Goodness only knows.

Over 300 migrants have arrived into the UK today alone.
Over 300 migrants have arrived into the UK today alone.

And folks look, even if they didn't come here to abide by our rules, after so blatantly breaking them in entering our nation illegally, to begin with, thanks to a myriad of human rights laws, there is precious little that we can do to remove them.

According to The Times, one of the flagship bills in the Queen's Speech on May 10th, setting out the legislative agenda for the next session of parliament, will reportedly contain an overhaul of human rights legislation. An overhaul would give Britain the power to deport serious foreign criminals in most cases automatically.

The Queen's Speech will reportedly contain an overhaul of human rights legislation.
The Queen's Speech will reportedly contain an overhaul of human rights legislation.

It's a move that may well mean we leave the European Convention on Human Rights, the ECHR. This convention is often used to curtail the United Kingdom's ability to remove foreign criminals via Article 8 of the ECHR, which protects the right to family life.

Meaning foreign criminals with relatives here in Britain have been able to avoid being deported by claiming, through lefty lawyer legalese, that we would be infringing upon their right to be nearer to their family.

In an utterly perverse ruling, Justice Secretary Dominic Raab offered an example of a man convicted of domestic violence who avoided deportation by claiming that his right to family life would be impacted by deportation. This is patently absurd and an abuse of laudable-sounding legislation.

The Ministry of Justice reckons that Article 8 is used in about seven in 10 successful challenges against deportation. And if you ask me, folks, if taking back control from the EU's open borders is to mean anything, we have to be able to remove those who come here to break the law.

We've become a soft touch nation. It should be UK courts and UK legislation that puts into place Britain's human rights laws; if Brexit meant absolutely anything at all, it must put our courts, our parliament, and our borders above Strasbourg.