'VERY promising!' - Scientists reveal Christmas tradition that could help beat cancer

Christmas tree needles could help in the fight against cancer.
Christmas tree needles could help in the fight against cancer.

The substance cut rapidly-growing mouth cancer cells significantly in a study

Published

Christmas tree needles contain luteolin, which can stop tumour growth, scientists have revealed.

Experts claim this could help beat cancer.

In an investigation, needles from discarded trees were dried and grounded to extract the luteolin.

Then added to mouth cancer cells, rapidly-growing ones were cut by more than half.

The process also worked quickly, with the cell count dropping by a quarter in 24 hours.

Luteolin can also be found in Christmas veg as a flavonoid.

Dr Bartosz Tylkowski, who led the study, told The Sun: “Each year, millions of trees are thrown away when they could be a valuable and cheap source of luteolin.

“We proved it is very promising for oral health.”

Brits face a significant threat from mouth and throat cancers, with more than 12,000 a year affected by conditions.

The Oral Health Foundation warned last month that mouth tumours are at a record high, rising by a third in a decade.