NHS crisis leading to 500 deaths a week is a symptom of a ‘BROKEN’ Britain says Nigel Farage

It has been estimated that delays in emergency care are leading to the deaths of up to 500 people a week

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Nigel Farage has said the NHS crisis that is expected to lead to the death of 500 people a week is a “classic symptom” of a “broken Britain”.

The pressure on the NHS is “intolerable and unsustainable”, medics have said, amid warnings that the deaths of up to 500 people each week could be caused by delays in emergency care.

It comes after more than a dozen NHS trusts and ambulance services declared critical incidents over the festive period, with officials citing rising flu cases and the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic among the reasons for the pressure on the health service.

In November, 37,837 patients waited more than 12 hours in A&E for a decision to be admitted to a hospital department, according to figures from NHS England.

Nigel Farage has said the NHS crisis that is expected to lead to the death of 500 people a week is a “classic symptom” of a “broken Britain”.
Nigel Farage has said the NHS crisis that is expected to lead to the death of 500 people a week is a “classic symptom” of a “broken Britain”.
The pressure on the NHS is “intolerable and unsustainable”, medics have said, amid warnings that the deaths of up to 500 people each week could be caused by delays in emergency care.
The pressure on the NHS is “intolerable and unsustainable”, medics have said, amid warnings that the deaths of up to 500 people each week could be caused by delays in emergency care.

This is an increase of almost 355% compared with the previous November, when the figure was 10,646.

Reacting, Nigel Farage said: “I've been wondering why every week when we get the Office of National Statistics figures for deaths, we've had an excess death rate running at about 800 a week and it's been going on for months.

“Was it harms caused by the vaccine? Was it a lack of diagnoses that happened during lockdown? I couldn't get my head around it.

“Well, now we get from medical professionals an estimate that up to 500 people a week are dying because they're not getting proper A&E treatment in our hospitals.

“The figure is truly extraordinary. It's quite stunning, it's absolutely awful. And yet there isn't that much of a fuss about it, because we’ve just jolly well got to put up with it.

“This is a classic symptom. I'm afraid, of broken Britain, and I'd love to approach the new year with more optimism than I feel at the moment, but I'm sorry, I just can’t.”