White privilege is a myth, and a divisive and dangerous myth at that, says Darren Grimes

I feel sorry for kids at our schools today, I really do

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I tell you what; I feel sorry for kids at our schools today, I really do. Not only are you led to believe that your species faces imminent extinction thanks to apocalyptic climate change and that there are more genders than there are options at a pick 'n' mix, but you're also led to believe that the colour of your skin makes you either inherently privileged or one of life's victims.

Kids today are told that they ought to feel shame and guilt over the colour of their skin and are demoralised by this frankly racist notion of so-called white privilege, or for their "whiteness", to pinch the language of the activist classes.

The best-selling author Douglas Murray passed a big public sign in Southwark in London this week that read "hey straight white men, pass the power!" in capital letters. We wouldn't accept any other form of discriminatory messages to be splashed upon a public billboard.

White privilege is a myth, says Darren Grimes.
White privilege is a myth, says Darren Grimes.

Would London Mayor Sadiq Khan accept a billboard that read "hey biological men, get out of women’s bathrooms!". Of course not.

What message does it send to the next generation that, if they're not white, they don't have any power and that if they're white, they ought to engage in some form of self-flagellation and recognise the power structures holding ethnic minority groups back.

Darren Grimes slams London Mayor Sadiq Khan.
Darren Grimes slams London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

I'm the grandson of a miner, the son of a single parent that was left on her own on a council estate to raise three children because my father was too interested in alcohol and Newcastle United to take some damn responsibility; I got my first job when I was 15, how dare these people talk about the need for us to recognise this racist notion?

White privilege is a myth, and a divisive and dangerous myth at that.

It's also just not backed up by the evidence either. From Darlington to Dagenham, the data continues to fly in the face of this argument, suggesting that if you're white and on free school meals, you're least likely to go to university. Figures released on Thursday by the Department for Education showed that, for the first time, white young people are now proportionately the least likely of all major ethnic groups to attend our top universities.

This all comes as the Don’t Divide Us group found nearly one in four local councils are actively promoting a divisive brand of ‘anti-racism’ in schools, pushing the racist notions of ‘white privilege and ‘unconscious bias’ into schools.

Music star Stormzy created scholarships solely to aid black students in gaining a Cambridge University education – a laudable thing to do. But when Professor Sir Bryan Thwaites approached Winchester and Dulwich colleges with an offer of scholarships for poor white boys, he was told Winchester "did not see how discrimination on grounds of a boy’s colour could ever be compatible with its values”, while Dulwich said that bursaries should be available to all who pass its entrance exam, “irrespective of their background”.