Some may sneer at the campaign to bring back pounds and ounces, but it’s a part of our identity, says Darren Grimes

Some have asked why we even bothered to vote to leave the EU, why put ourselves through the torment of arduous, never-ending negotiations with the Brussels conglomerate

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Some have asked why we even bothered to vote to leave the EU, why put ourselves through the torment of arduous, never-ending negotiations with the Brussels conglomerate over abstract concepts like freedom, sovereignty and control?

But Euroscepticism, you see, wasn't a concept dreamt up over polling day on June 23rd 2016; it was an idea brought about thanks to a constant drip-drip of European federalism stripping away the Union Jack varnish of what many felt were the very foundations of British life and our national identity.

For those under 40, the British imperial system included ounces, pounds, tons, yards, miles and feet. Some of those you're no doubt familiar with. The imperial system stretches back to 1824, standard across the Empire by 1826. So it was no small thing to criminalise its use.

Boris Johnson's plans to bring back imperial measurements have been revealed.
Boris Johnson's plans to bring back imperial measurements have been revealed.

So when, in 2000, the British government adopted an EU directive into UK law that meant traders must display metric units or face criminal charges - this played a massive role in exposing the influence that Brussels bureaucrats now had in British decision making.

And it was Sunderland that would force the issue into the national conversation when the Sunderland grocer Steven Thoburn had his imperial weigh(ing) scales seized by undercover trading standards officers. Mr Thoburn was a patriot giving his customers what they were used to and what they wanted: They wanted a pound of bananas, they were used to shopping in such measures.

Darren Grimes has praised the plan to bring back imperial measurements.
Darren Grimes has praised the plan to bring back imperial measurements.

In 2016, the image of the night would be the woman in Sunderland, proud as punch, hoisted up into the air as jubilant voters and Vote Leave activists punching the air with glee. A real shame, of course that Mr Thoburn wasn't around to see it happen. He died suddenly in 2004 at the age of 39. He spent three years through Courts with the case and a criminal conviction for not converting to metric measurements.

He ought to receive a Royal Pardon. An ordinary market trader who's now been completely vindicated by our vote to leave.

So whilst some in the media may sneer and laugh at the odd, quirky British campaign to bring back pounds and ounces and the crown stamp upon a pint glass, it's a part of our identity, history, and our culture. I welcome the return by Boris Johnson's government. If you ask me, this is the most incredible comeback since Elton John's hair transplant.

In a week when we all rightly celebrate our selfless and longest-serving monarch for the platinum jubilee, it's right that we give a nod to the tradition, history and values of our great nation. Cheers, Boris!