Nana Akua: I get that people want to escape this planet after the harm we are apparently causing it

Let’s be honest, if you could afford it, you’d try and escape. Who wouldn’t?

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Now I get that people want to escape this planet after the harm we are apparently causing it. But what I am struggling to contend with is what’s so great about going to space?

If someone said to me — 'hey, I am going to offer you the holiday of a lifetime. You will take off in a rocket, which will separate from its booster capsule and reach a maximum altitude of 66.5 miles.... It will then reenter the atmosphere and fall back to earth, making a gentle touchdown guided by three parachutes. The trip will last 10 minutes and 30 seconds and will be completely free. Did you say free?!'

My reaction would be - I’m suspicious. You’ve got to ask yourself SOME questions, surely! Like, why?

William Shatner, after pretending to go to space in Star Trek - which was one of my favourite shows of all time - decided he wanted to do it for real, so he actually went to space, well the edge of space.

Remember the beginning of Star Trek, to boldly go where no man has ever gone before, at 90 years old, he became the oldest person to go to space — the edge of space.

So what did the stars make of Shatner's trip? Screen legend and one of my absolute heroes, Dame Joan Collins, gave a pretty scathing verdict, calling William Shatner, wait for it, a FOOL! She’s fabulous isn’t she. She said “It’s amazing isn’t it? What a fool. Who wants to do that? He was in the air and they were turning him upside down. Let’s take care of this planet first before we start going off."

So who's side are you on? If you were offered a trip to space for free, would you go?

Dame Joan Collins was basically in support of the Duke of Cambridge’s view on space tourism, with Prince William recently saying: "We need some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on trying to repair this planet, not trying to find the next place to go."

The justification for the frivolous polluting act of space tourism is given the rising temperatures, fueling environmental degradation, natural disasters, weather extremes, food and water insecurity, economic disruption, conflict, and terrorism. The sea levels are rising, the Arctic is melting, coral reefs are dying, oceans are acidifying, and forests are burning.

Let’s be honest, if you could afford it, you’d try and escape. Who wouldn’t?

With Cop 26 around the corner, world leaders are getting together to discuss the burgeoning climate emergency. Hydrogen and electric cars, heat pumps and eye watering levies on fossil fuel polluting industries are all on the agenda.

So I ask again, would you go into space if offered a free trip?