Mercy Muroki: The public servants we fund shouldn't put their ideology before a duty to serve the public

I hope his suspension sends a message to any public servant who wants to put their ideology before their duty to serve the people they're supposed to serve. Us.

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A GP has been suspended for using his Twitter to unleash a long campaign of insults towards people who were critical of the trans movement.

In one tweet, Dr Adrian Harrop said this: "Cisgender people, on the whole, are just awful and there needs to be a massive state sponsored programme of re-education."

He also said that the campaigns of those who express criticism about the trans movement should be "brought to an end, by whatever means necessary."

Cisgender people, for those that are unfamiliar with the term, means anyone who is not trans. In other words, 99.9% of us.

So, Dr Harrop, who until now has been in charge of caring for the public thinks that 99.9% of the public are awful people.

And not only that, that they need to be subjected to state-sponsored re-education, presumably so they can have their minds reconditioned to support all the views of the trans lobby.

State-sponsored programme of re-education – where have I heard that before? If Dr Harrop really thinks this is how to treat people who disagree with his views, he might consider relocating to... I don’t know China, or perhaps 1930s Germany.

The tribunal has said that Harrop's posts were inappropriate for a GP in a public forum.

Inappropriate for a public servant to publicly lambast 99% of the public? – well, I never.

It also said that "his actions brought the profession into disrepute, undermining public confidence in the profession and the standards of conduct expected from members of the profession."

And that's right. If I was unwell and I turned up to a GP surgery, only to find that a man who had been posting abuse to women online was sat in front of me, I'd be inclined to take my chances and just walk right back out of the door.

If the public can't be sure that a GP will treat them equally, irrespective of sex, race, or views – then he's not fit for the job.

I hope his suspension sends a message to any public servant who wants to put their ideology before their duty to serve the people they're supposed to serve. Us.

And I commend the tribunal for upholding the high standards we deserve from the public servants we fund.