Mercy Muroki: Harper's law, I hope this trajectory of giving criminals exactly what they deserve continues

After a two-year campaign by the brave widow of PC Andrew Harper, who was mercilessly dragged to death by a car of feral thugs while responding to a 999 call, justice has prevailed.

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It is rare that I talk about the criminal justice system that it involves good news. But this morning, the news that the mandatory life sentences for people who kill emergency workers - even if accidentally, whilst committing another crime - could be handed down is that rare bit of good news we all need.

After a two-year campaign by the brave widow of PC Andrew Harper, who was mercilessly dragged to death by a car of feral thugs while responding to a 999 call, justice has prevailed.

The three cowards convicted received meagre sentences of 16 years and 13 years. They smirked their way through the whole ordeal, even boasting they didn't care AS they were getting arrested, and have shown absolutely no remorse since.

Now, as tragic as the circumstances that have led to Harper's Law making its way onto the statute books are, the law change is music to my ears – and in fact, the best news to come out of criminal justice since PC Wayne Couzens was handed down a whole life order two months ago for the kidnap, rape and Murder of Sarah Everard.

And I hope this trajectory of giving criminals exactly what they deserve continues.

For all of this Conservative government's failings – and quite frankly, there are too many to name – at least they're not being a complete failure on their promise to be the party of law and order.

The Police, Sentencing and Crime bill which should become law early next year is the tough-on-crime approach I want to see from a Conservative government.

For instance, it makes the 'starting point' for sentencing of child murders a whole life order. So life will mean life for more of these irredeemable monsters.

It also changes the point at which offenders are eligible for release for some sexual and violent offenders from half way through their sentence, to two thirds of the way through their sentence – better, but still too lenient in my view...

The point is – polls repeatedly show that the British Public want the law to be firm and fair. It currently isn't. Judges hand down pathetic sentences; Murderous convicts are let loose onto our streets too soon; and it too often seems the rights of offenders are put before the rights of their victim.

So, I very much welcome Harper's Law; and any other law that delivers real justice rather than the second-rate poundland justice our courts currently deliver.

And I commend and salute Lissie Harper, PC Harper's widow, for her strength and courage in taking on the unfairness of the justice system.