King Charles III has given himself to the British people in a deeply emotional way, says Dan Wootton

It’s incredible to think how much has changed in just one week. Last Tuesday, Queen Elizabeth the Great met her new Prime Minister Liz Truss.

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In the last hour, just behind my shoulder, the late Her Majesty the Queen – who I will now refer to as Elizabeth the Great – returned to Buckingham Palace.

Tonight, she will rest at her official London residence since the death of her father for the final time, before she officially lies in state from tomorrow.

In another historic day, the new king travelled to Northern Ireland as his mother left her beloved Scotland.

Tomorrow, London is expected to become full as hundreds of thousands – potentially even a million folk – queue to see the late Queen’s coffin.

Meanwhile, highly significant new polling released YouGov released today reveals an unprecedented surge in support behind the new king.

In March just 39 per cent predicted Charles would be a good ruler, while 31 per cent thought he would be bad in the role.

But within days of his mother’s death, the public’s evaluation has completely flipped.

Now 63 per cent think he will be a good king, with only 15 per cent saying he will do a bad job.

Despite republicans desperately hoping the late Queen’s death would lead to a re-evaluation of our political system, support for the monarchy remains stable at 62 per cent, with just 21 per cent calling for a revolution.

Even Camilla, who the public (and, yes, that includes me) have harboured significant doubts about becoming Queen now has the support of the majority, with 53 per cent saying she will do a good job, with only 18 per cent believing she will be bad.

Dan Wootton
Dan Wootton

And as I write in a new column tonight for MailOnline, I’m happy to admit I’m one of those Brits who has changed my mind on our new king.

Charles, deep in his own incalculable grief for his ‘mama’, has given himself to the British people in a way that I have found deeply emotional and convincing.

While his mother is peerless, I feel what Charles has done, with the face time, the hugs and even the kisses, is reach out to the public in a way that suggests he will be a more hands-on monarch.

His worth ethic this week has been truly phenomenal – like a force of nature, this 73-year-old knows he’s been waiting his entire life for this moment and nothing will hold him back now.

And it’s made a difference – on the biggest stage he will ever have, Charles has been pitch perfect, from pledging to remain apolitical and stop campaigning for controversial issues in his King’s Speech, to taking control of the wayward members of his family, there hasn’t yet been one misstep.

Of course, it is early days.

The challenges ahead for Charles are seismic.

But it’s incredible to think how much has changed in just one week.Last Tuesday, Queen Elizabeth the Great met her new Prime Minister Liz Truss.

Seven days later, she lies in her coffin at Buckingham Palace and Charles is the new monarch widely supported by the British public.