Dan Wootton: Keir Starmer is the best example of our failed Covid policies

It’s now obvious that constant boosters for the healthy is no longer a sustainable path out of this pandemic.

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Could there be a better example of our failed coronavirus policies than Sir Keir Starmer, who is in isolation AGAIN after contracting Covid-19?

The Leader of No Opposition has already spent numerous stints in isolation – following the ludicrous rules that he’s supported that are continuing to unnecessarily damage our economy.

And, despite being boosted just one month ago, Starmer has been locked up another time for at least seven days.

In fact, this is his sixth time in isolation. Meaning he's been out of action for 57 days.

Now his salary is paid for by us as taxpayers, so he probably doesn’t care.

He’s got his lovely London mansion, with lots of technology to communicate with his staff, and delivery drivers aplenty to service his every need.

But if he was struggling to put food on the table or trying to run a small business then yet another week out of the world would be infuriating and potentially catastrophic.

Before he found himself in lockdown again, Starmer proved he doesn’t understand the lessons from Omicron – that vaccinating the young and the healthy is no silver bullet. He’s an example that it doesn’t stop transmission.

Take his answer about keeping schools open: Vaccinate more healthy kids.

Starmer hasn’t worked it out yet, has he?

He’s got Covid just four weeks after being boosted.

It’s now obvious that constant boosters for the healthy is no longer a sustainable path out of this pandemic.

While you might not hear this being discussed on the BBC, Sky News or ITV – or by our gutless political leaders – this is not an extremist or niche view.

In fact, it’s a position this week bravely shared by Professor Sir Andrew Pollard – perhaps the most pro-vaccine human being in the land.

After all, he’s the chairman of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) and one of the driving forces behind the development of the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab.

In a bombshell interview with the Daily Telegraph this week, he made comments that suggest Israel’s plan to vaccinate the population with a fourth jab is likely wrong.

His words are worth noting.

Professor Pollard said…

“The future must be focusing on the vulnerable and making boosters or treatments available to them to protect them.

“We know that people have strong antibodies for a few months after their third vaccination, but more data are needed to assess whether, when and how often those who are vulnerable will need additional doses.

“We can’t vaccinate the planet every four to six months. It’s not sustainable or affordable. In the future, we need to target the vulnerable.”

He could not be clearer.

The days of the government cajoling – or if you’re President Macron in France – quite simply bullying healthy folk into being jabbed multiple times must end.

This conversation is going to be difficult for politicians who have put so much faith into jabs.

But when Mr Vaccination himself says we’ve got to stop this sort of one-eyed focus on boosting everyone every few weeks, we must take note.